home

RSS
Log in or Register to enjoy more features of Torn World!
New to Torn World? Find out more about our shared-world project here!


Sea Monsters!
home
musefusion
start here
start here
stories
poetry
art
reference
map
timeline
articles
characters
creators
join us
forum
subscribe

submit work
karma
credits
contact
staff
log in/out

New to Torn World? Find out more about our shared-world project here!

Vote for us at
Top Web Fiction!

-->


(Show/Hide Browsing Column ->)

In Willow's Arms   myth  
Creators: Elizabeth Barrette (Writer), Ally Loughrin (Patron)
A poem about why Willow is associated with death in Northern lore.
Posted: 03/22/10      [3 Comments] ~ 160 words.
 

When once the world was young,
Limber as a girl, lithe
In delicate dancing --
Death came down the mountain.

All the spirits were spry --
Shagback and snowshoe hare,
Fern and Fireweed, all
But Willow got away.

Willow tripped, tunic hem
Fast under her fine foot,
Falling toward Death's fierce hands --
Caught, held, cuddled and kissed.

Death gave her such grand gifts --
Beads of bright dew, sunbeams
Gleaming gold, good rich earth --
Lulling her. "Be my love."

Willow looked at dear Death,
Consented to consort,
Said, "I want one more wish."
"Say it, and so be it."

"Let my bark bring healing,
Peace and release from pain."
"Done," said Death, and it was.
Willow wept gratitude.

Willow lady, Death's love,
Dances through fever dreams
To heal us or help us
Walk away from this world.

So healers seek her help
To fight the fierce fevers.
So we lay dead to sleep
In Willow's wise, wide arms.

Author's Notes

This poem came out of the March 16, 2010 Muse Fusion. It was prompted and sponsored by Allykat. Many cultures have a myth about Death coming into the world and choosing a bride -- to the Northerners, the chosen lover is the spirit of Willow.


Home | Characters | Art | Fiction | Articles | Messageboard | Contact | Member Login

Donate to support our operating and promotional costs!
Or, subscribe and support individual creators!

[Concept and Site Design: Ellen Million | Website basecode: Ron Swartzendruber]
[No portion of this site's content may be used or copied without prior, written consent.]